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Full text of "Annual report"

JOSEPH L. ALIOTO 
Mayor 



CITY AND COUNTY 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 

AIRPORTS COMMISSION 

William E. McDonnell, President 
John A. Sutro, Vice President 
William K. Coblentz 
Wallace R. Lynn 
Joseph P. Mazzola 

STAFF 

William J. Dwyer, Director of Airports 
M. F. Bagan, Deputy Director, Operations & Maintenance 
Thomas F. Bertken, Deputy Director, Planning & Development 
William V. Paizis, Deputy Director, Business & Administration 
Richard B. Newport, Commission Secretary 




AIRPORTS COMMISSION 




Left to Right: Wallace R. Lynn, Joseph P. Mazzola, William 
E. McDonnell, President, John A. Sutro, Vice President, 
and William K. Coblentz. 



MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT 

As the fifth busiest Airport in the United States in terms of passenger volume, 
it was in the best interest of San Francisco to have a separate Airports Com- 
mission charged solely with governing Airport matters to keep pace with 
technological advances and dynamic growth of the airlines industry; to pro- 
vide safe, efficient and suitable airport facilities; and to cope with the increasing 
passenger, commercial and industrial development of San Francisco and the 
Bay Area. 

The San Francisco International Airports Commission was therefore created 
in September 1970, pursuant to a City Charter Amendment. The City Charter 
Amendment provided for a governing body of five Commissioners appointed 
by the Mayor of San Francisco for four year terms. The Commission elects a 
President and Vice President and appoints the Director of the Airport. 

During January 1973, James K. Carr, Director of Airports since September 
1970, resigned. William J. Dwyer, former Deputy Director of Business at the 
Airport, was appointed Director of Airports, to succeed Mr. Carr. The appoint- 
ment of Mr. Dwyer provided the continuity required during a critical period 
in negotiations with the airlines concerning the further development of the 
Airport. Mr. Dwyer had been intimately involved in the negotiations prior to 
his appointment. 

The Airports Commission is extremely confident that Airports Director Dwyer 
will provide the expertise required to meet the challenges of the next decade. 

william e. McDonnell 

President 



DIRECTOR'S REPORT 1972-1973 




San Francisco International Airport passenger volume reached record high levels for the second consecutive year during 1972-73. This annual record is more significant 
considering that it was accomplished with fewer scheduled aircraft movements than took place at the Airport during 1969. Since 1968, San Francisco International 
Airport passenger volume has increased by 2.7 million while scheduled aircraft movements have remained relatively constant. 

The significant growth this past year in passenger volume, cargo shipments, and total revenues allowed the Airports Commission to maintain fiscal independence for the 
17th consecutive year. The Airports Commission kept the cost of operations 11.9% under the authorized budget. 

The Airport Expansion Program continues to be our major concern. The Airport staff expended considerable time and effort implementing the administrative steps 
necessary to gain approval for the program. Concurrent with several Expansion Program Environmental Impact Report public hearings during the third and fourth 
quarters, other administrative documents analogous to the Expansion Program were negotiated and culminated. They included the Airlines Landing Fees Agreement, 
the United Airlines Maintenance Base Lease, approval of a Master Revenue Bond Resolution for the Airport Expansion Program, and a new schedule of landing fees, 
rates and charges for airlines operating out of San Francisco. All of the aforementioned documents were of considerable economic importance to the City and Countv. 
and represent a major step in the process of final approval and the modernization and development of the Airport. 

Provisions were also made to reimburse the City and County of San Francisco, 24 million dollars advanced to the Airport prior to 1957. Repayment of these funds will 
be at the rate of $2 million per year. 

From a personnel standpoint, progress was made on a three year program to bring the Operations and Maintenance Division up to a manning level consistent with the 
requirements for an Airport preventative maintenance program. The Airport Security Force was expanded to meet new Federal Regulations for screening passengers 
and operating area security. 

Construction at the Airport during the fiscal year was brisk. Thirty-nine projects totaling $21.7 million were completed or are now in progress. Major projects included 
the International Rotunda scheduled to open in the first quarter of 1974, and the foundation for the North Terminal, scheduled for completion in 1975. Tenant 
improvement construction focused on temporary expansion of boarding areas for Western, TWA, National, Delta, Northwest and PSA to accommodate wide-bodied 
aircraft. Other improvements were initiated by United, Pan American and TWA to improve the flow, disposition and treatment of industrial waste water prior to reach- 
ing the treatment plant. 

Airside construction was highlighted by installation of new concrete aprons, high speed taxiway exits, and the 
initial stages of the Runway 28R extension which is scheduled for Category III operation by 1975. These, along 
with routine runway overlay and upkeep projects, combined to make a busy summer for Operations, which must 
coordinate construction while overseeing approximately 1,000 aircraft movements per month. 

In line with ever-increasing pressures to include environmental safeguards in all facets of Airpoit operations, the 
Airport initiated more stringent policies, operating procedures, rules and regulations concerning the treatment of 
industrial and sanitary waste. The measures implemented this fiscal year represent a majot step forward to develop 
a master system, meeting present stringent State requirements and providing increased capacity. When completed 
in 1 975, Airport capital cost outlay for this program will reach $1 5 million. 

In closing, it is appropriate to express my sincere appreciation for the continuing cooperation of City and County 
-^flfettfe^ officials, the Federal Aviation Administration, the scheduled airlines serving San Francisco International Auport 

H B Wf and all others who help us provide the vital Airport services needed by the Gateway to the Pacific. 

Hi nM y We look forward to the challenges of the forthcoming year, 




William j. dJvyer 



Director of Airports 




AIRPORT STAFF 

OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE 



MAINTENANCE 



M. F. Bagan 

Deputy Director /Operations 
and Maintenance 



OPERATIONS 





Gerald F. Raye - Head Airport Electrician 
John R. Stain ton - Airport Mechanical Maintenance Supervisor 
David H. Matlock - Assistant Deputy Director Maintenance 
George N. Nessel - Airport Maintenance Superintendent 
Alvin L. Benas - Sewage Treatment Plant Superintendent 



Silvio J. Tringali - Superintendent of Operations, John S. Mullin - 
Communications Supervisor, Roy S. Samuels - Assistant Deputy 
Director/Operations, Steven J. Misera - Custodial Supervisor. 



SECURITY 





Chief Robert E. Clancy 



FIRE RESCUE 



Lt. Philip A. Meginness, Lt. Palmer L. Bass, Chief Edward J. 
Nevin, Lt. Columbus Sims and Lt. Robert M. Bom ben. 



Captain Frank Drago, Captain William Murphy and Captain 
William McGee. 



3 1223 06354 4564 



AIR TRAFFIC 



Air passenger volume and air freight shipments again established 
record highs during the year. 

Passenger traffic totaling 16,205,150 represented a 10.5 percent 
gain over Fiscal Year 1971-72 and topped the previous record high 
of 14,664,191 established last year by over 1 .5 million. 

The upward trend in air passenger flow resumed in October 1971. 
All-time highs have been recorded for the past twelve months. 

The daily average air passenger volume approached 45,000 with 
daily peaks of approximately 65,000 during pre-Christmas travel. 



PASSENGER FLOW 



% Increase 
(Decrease) 




AIR FREIGHT 



Air freight shipments increased by 8.1 percent, reaching a record high 
of 673,139,035 pounds and topping last year's record of 622,651 ,024 
pounds by over 50.4 million pounds. 



AIR FREIGHT 



% Incrsas* 
(Decrease) 



66,534,120 




Millions 
of Pounds i 



281,854,464 



448.379.048 



687.189.214 



622 651.025 



873.139.035 



150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 650 700 



20 1 

10.7) 

19.3 

8 1 
6 8 

24 7 

9 8 
263 
48 3 
38 5 
14 5 
13 2 
16.7 

16 71 
78 
8 1 



Air express volume for the year increas 
pounds. 



3.3 percent to 18,1! 




U.S. Mail shipped by air declined. The 206,560,903 pound tr>Tfl! w.i 
percent less than last year. The decline is attributed in large pj^^^P^ 
lesser volume of military mail to Southeast Asia. 




AIRCRAFT 
MOVEMENTS 



Aircraft movements — arrivals and departures — totaled 359,857 for the year, an 
increase of 1.3 percent. Scheduled aircraft movements increased 3.1 percent, 
while general aviation classifications — nonscheduled carrier and itinerant air- 
craft — again declined. 







AIRPORT STAFF 




LANDING 
FEES 
30.2% 






FISCAL DATA 



Fiscal Year 1972-73 operating revenues of $22,100,599 were more than 
adequate to defray all operations expenditures, debt service costs (bond 
interest and redemption) and San Mateo County taxes. 

Expenditures totaled $19,464,461, including debt service costs. The 
$2,636,138 surplus will be used to finance Airport improvements and 
betterments and to aid in financing the multi-million dollar program of 
expansion and development. 

Revenues for the fiscal year were 3.9 percent higher than 1971-72. Major 
items of income and comparisons with the previous year are: 



1972-73 



1971-72 



Air Carrier Flight Operations 

Landing Fee Surcharge 

Rentals 

Concessions: 

Restaurant and Bar $ 979,352 

Newsstands, Gifts 
and Sundries 815,356 

Parking Garage 

and lots 3,842,276 
Ground Transportation: 



Taxis 

Other 
Auto Rentals 
Hotel (Hilton Inn) 
Auto Service Stations 



339,925 
193,427 
1 ,894,486 
231,156 
168,589 



TOTALS 



Miscellaneous 
Other Income 



$ 3,921.408 
2,018,444 
4,156,720 



TOTAL 



$ 8,464,567 
1,210,122 
2,329,338 

$22,100,599 



S 937,914 
790,593 
3,622,981 

307,317 
170,607 
2,030,225 
197,506 
148,993 



$ 3,746,057 
2,003.274 
4,079,396 



$ 8,206,136 
1 ,049,658 
2,187,397 

$21,271,916 



Expenditures totaling $19,464,461 were up 12.8 percent for the'1972- 
73 fiscal period. The increase was due primarily to greater operational costs, 
plus a 7.9 percent rise in taxes paid to San Mateo County. 

Major expenditures were: 



1972-73 

Salaries, Wages and Retirement $ 5,090,157 

Fire/Rescue Division 912,743 

Services — Other City Departments 439,724 

Contractual Services, 

Material & Supplies 3,427,024 

Bond Interest and Redemption 8,324,015 

Taxes Paid to San Mateo County 473,696 

Other 797,102 



1971-72 

$ 4,627,177 

856,690 
437,968 

2,618,723 
7,726,053 
439,027 
551 ,093 



TOTAL 



$19,464,461 



$17,256,731 



STATISTICAL SUMMARY 



Revenues 

Expenditures 
Operations 
Debt Service 

Taxes Paid to San Mateo County 
TOTAL 

Book Value 

No. of Employees excluding 
Fire and Rescue Division 

Passenger Total 

U.S. Mail by Air (Lbs) 

Air Cargo (Freight and Express Lbs) 

Aircraft Movements 



1972-73 

$ 22,100,549 

10,666,750 
8,324,015 
473,696 

$ 19,464,461 
$136,840,289 

476 

16,205.150 
206,560,993 
691,297,860 
359,857 



1971-72 

$ 21,271,918 

9,091,651 
7,726,053 
439,027 

$ 17,256,731 
$129,048,837 

458 
14,664,191 
234,769,081 
638,680,604 
355,413 



AIRPORT STAFF 

PLANNING, ENGINEERING 
AND CONSTRUCTION 




Robert G. Lee - Chief Engineer 

Joseph H. New - Construction Engineer 

Dale H. Fearn - Assistant Deputy Director/Planning 





Thomas G. Bertken 
Deputy Director/Planning, 
Engineering and Construction 



U N I r m o m _4 l R 



North Terminal 
Foundation 





CONSTRUCTION 



Capital Improvement Program progress at San Francisco Inter- 
national Airport involved 39 projects valued at S21 ,769,759.03. 
Of these, 27 projects costing $12,100,144.03 were completed. 
The remaining 12 projects valued at $9, 669, 61 5 are scheduled 
for completion after June 30, 1973. 

Completion of the "Terminal Roads, East Underpass and 
Entrance Road Lighting" project together with future com- 
pletion of the "Upper Loop Road" project presently under 
construction will relieve auto congestion in the terminal areas. 

In addition to betterments, Central Terminal ramps between 
the ticket and baggage lobbies were carpeted in the initial im- 
plementation of Airports Commission policy to carpet all 
public areas in the terminals. Central Terminal building altera 
tions are also under way to construct the Airport Medical Clinic. 

Reconstruction and replacement of existing facilities ptovided 
a new section for the Force Main connecting the leimmal aiea 
to the Water Quality Control Plant, and also installed an 
asphaltic concrete overlay of the apron pavement serving several 
airlines between Piers C and D. 

Projects under way and scheduled for eaily completion include 
construction of Rotunda A ($4,003,494); Pilings and Founda 
tion for North Terminal (S3, 778, 614); and the previously 
mentioned Upper Loop Road ($847,500). 



Rotunda A will provide new terminal facilities tor three inter- 
national carriers. The North Terminal construction is the initial 
phase of a four story terminal building which provides the 
capability to handle increased passenger traffic providing an 
additional one half million square feet of terminal space. 

Under the Federal Airport Development Aid Program of 1970, 
SFIA has received $17.7 million assistance in 27 improvement 
projects costing $38.9 million. During this year under ADAP 
4 and 5, 13 Airport improvement contracts valued over $8.8 
million will receive 56.6% federal participation amounting to 
over $5 million. 

Big construction jobs are always a mess . . . and they seem to 
go on forever . . . But when they're finally completed, every- 
thing looks beautiful and everyone agrees it was worth it. We 
are presently in the process of an Airport development program 
which, during construction, will cause some inconvenience. 
Every precaution is taken to minimize the impact of construc- 
tion on the normal day-to-day operations. 



WATER POLLUTION CONTROL 

Completion of the new secondary treatment Water Quality Control Plant 
on the Airport permitted attention to be directed toward improving indus- 
trial wastes effluent to meet discharge requirements of the Regional Water 
Quality Control Board. 

An ongoing Water Pollution Quality Control Program consisting of periodic 
monitoring, sampling and inspection assists the Airport in meeting the 
stringent requirements of the Regional Quality Control regulations. 

INDUSTRIAL WASTE WATER 

Meeting the time schedule set by the Regional Water Quality Control 
Board, a study of the industrial waste program or requirements at SFIA 
was initiated in April 1973. The study will include recommendations for 
an overall Airport industrial waste collection and treatment system, along 
with the preliminary design and selection of a complete industrial waste 
treatment process. The final report with recommendations is expected to 
be submitted in September 1973. 




SUPPORTING CITY 





SAN FRANCISCO 
INTERNATIONAL 
AIRPORT 



SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT GROWTH. In 1966, in an 
effort to establish a base for future planning, the management of San Francisco 
International Airport undertook studies of then-current and anticipated air 
travel. Early predictions of 16 to 18 million air passengers annually were 
quickly and dramatically outdated with the advent of wide-bodied jets and an 
unprecedented growth in air travel. 

In short order a master plan was created, and implemented by the Office of 
Planning and Development, which was charged with the responsibility of 
developing a suitable expansion program. 

San Francisco Airport Architects, a joint venture of John Carl Warnecke & 
Associates and Dreyfuss & Blackford, was retained to develop the plan, and 
in 1968, was awarded a contract for architectural and engineering services for 
six satellite boarding areas, or "rotundas," a new North Terminal building, a 
South Terminal expansion, roads, utilities and support facilities. 

During the same period, beginning in 1967, the Association of Bay Area 
Governments (ABAG), through its Regional Airport System Study Committee, 
undertook an in-depth study seeking solutions to the proliferating problems 
facing Bay Area airports. Problems brought about by growth and by subse- 
quent strain on airport facilities. 

While conducting this searching study, the ABAG Committee diligently ex- 
plored every facet of airport problems. A principal concern was to find ways 
to minimize the impact which needed changes might have upon the environ- 
ment. Technical studies were conducted over a wide range of subjects, including 
access and capacity requirements, environmental and economic aspects and a 
number of special subjects dealing with interrelationships with other regions, 
vertical and short take-off and landing aircraft, and airport ownership. Many 



public hearings were held to elicit a solid and meaningful public reaction. The 
study resulted in a region-wide plan encompassing the entire San Francisco 
Bay Area. 

The EIR was also thoroughly aired in San Mateo County where the San Mateo 
Airport Land Use Committee held a public hearing on March 8 and the San 
Mateo Planning Commission held public hearings on March 28 and another 
on the Final Draft Report on June 27, 1973. 

On May 1, 1973, the Airports Commission met and passed a resolution certi- 
fying the completeness and adopting the Final Environmental Impact Report 
and forwarded it to the Board of Supervisors. 

Meanwhile, the Board of Supervisors had under preparation an ordinance on 
Environmental Quality pursuant to the State of California Guidelines imple- 
menting the California Environmental Quality Act of 1970. This ordi 
was passed by the Board of Supervisors on April 9, 1973. 

On May 17, 1973, a petition was filed in Superior Court challenging the 
validity of the Airports Commission action. 

Although the Airport Expansion - EIR was theoretically exempt from this 
ordinance, the City Attorney advised that in light of the pending couit action 
the Airport Expansion be submitted to the Department of City Planning in 
accordance with the new Environmental Quality ordinance. Thus, on June 4, 
1972 the Board of Supervisors referred to the Department of City Planning 
the EIR for the Airport Expansion Program. 

The Department of City Planning, working with the Airport staff and con 
sultants, have completely revised the EIR and will publish the results by late 
July 1974 with public hearings by the Planning Commission in August and 
final acceptance in October 1974.